O Vista, where art thou?

Chris Pirillo already said what I was thinking but was afraid to say (via Mini-Microsoft).

Yet, my final point is different in that I really think Windows Vista is a great iteration of Microsoft Windows.

However, it somehow goes to show the state of today’s software. Apparently, developers are not able to adapt to a new operating system and environment that reveals almost each and every problem they create.

They don’t play well with installation and security, user interface guidelines, parallel programming and multi-processing.

And it all shows on Vista.

That frequent CTP are no means to speed up software migration. Everybody is just installing and passively "playing around".

That a new Windows version just causes anybody to abandon old hardware projects. Or did you find a usable driver for your graphic card on Windows Update?

That everybody waits for the very last second to get some piece of software out of the door. Or did an update for your legacy software ship in November 2006, when Vista was released? And now, isn’t that "new" version still in Beta?

That driver signing and application verification has become a necessity but customers still are not used to returning mediocre software to the store or vendor. Or did you ever return your copy of crappy DVD-authoring software?

DEVELOPERS: YOU TOO PROBABLY DIDN’T TEST YOUR SOFTWARE ON WINDOWS VISTA YET!

So, my advice for using Windows Vista is this: Get Vista pre-installed on a new, Vista-certified PC from a well-known and established PC vendor including each and every piece of hardware and software you think you’ll need. Don’t add some hardware unless there is an approved and signed driver available on Windows Update. Don’t add software that is not Vista-certified.

Return what does not satisfy your expectations. If the DVD-authoring software sucks, return the entire PC. Otherwise, you’ll never get back the hours of your life hassling with that crap.

I bought a custom-assembled PC from state-of-the-art components, thinking using it with Vista would be seamless.

I’m back to reality.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Computers and Internet. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to O Vista, where art thou?

  1. Isaac says:

    I read Chris’ comments and I immediately thought of How Microsoft Lost the API War from Joel Spolsky, in which he talked about the Raymend Chen’s camp… the MS’ effort about backward-compatiability and the difficulty in that.

    So in many ways… it’s probably the developers’ faults, but who else can they blame:

    If a) my software works before I install Vista, b) it doesn’t work after I install Vista.

    Then, the logical conclusion is: my software does not work BECAUSE of Vista.

    I guess that will take a long time for people to realize the absurdity in this logic.

    Btw, this blog is actually linked by Mini-Microsoft!

  2. Henry says:

    Iceman,
    I remember reading that article from Joel, but, at the time, thought he’d come to the wrong conclusion. Now, looking at the breadth of APIs Vista added to the Windows heritage, I have to say he’s probably right. With all the moving parts those 70,000 people between Lakes Washington and Sammamish create, it’s hard for a developer to follow, even more so "doing it right".
    This is why I think Microsoft should make a bigger effort to make verification and code-signing more popular.
     
    The link from Mini-Microsoft is a trackback artifact. I doubt I get juiced for that. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s